Danielle Brooks & Samira Wiley on Celebrity Girl Crushes

(Source: frankydagostino)

(Source: thegayteen)

ruinedchildhood:

NOOOOOO

(Source: jalenrosed)

whoalucas:

lukeyhemmowhy:

exceptionallyawkward17:

Calum Hood sassy tweet appreciation post.

"Who the hell is Olivia"

this is why i love him

gayindustrialcomplex:

fag3000:

gayindustrialcomplex:

Spiders eat their parents all the time and no one cares when they do it so what the fuck

did you eat your parents

How about you mind your own business

whenihavewingsto-fly:

collections that are raw as fuck on aura tout vu f/w 2014-15

Fuuuuuuuck.

kimchibae:

"dick is abundant and low value" i am screaming

zaynshair2k14:

bringingthetruthback:

tinalikesbutts:

So when boys want to wear tank tops, it’s okay, but when I want to do it, it’s indecent and my shoulders are going to give every boy in a 20-mile radius a boner?

if your underage and its a professional environment, wear professional clothing. women have sexual organs on their top half, men don’t, don’t you know biology??

breasts aren’t sexual organs and neither are shoulders do everyone a favor staple your hands to your ass

poppunkmutants:

but have you considered:

  • strong females who don’t denounce femininity or being girly
  • strong females who are “like every other girl” bc why the hell not girls are rad
  • strong females who tear down the culture of girls hating on other girls
  • strong females who are proud to be feminists
  • strong females who support and acknowledge trans women
  • strong females who understand that being strong isn’t synonymous with manly or with “acting like a man”

"A new paper on sexting among adolescents … called ‘Damned If You Do, Damned If You Don’t … If You’re a Girl’… [finds] that both girls and boys send and receive naked or semi-naked pictures of themselves with some regularity, but only the girls are socially punished for it. ‘Boys in our study described girls who did send sexts as ‘sluts’ or ‘insecure,’ whereas they characterized girls who did not send sexts as ‘prude’ or ‘stuck up,” University of Michigan researchers Julia Lippman and Scott Campbell write in the Journal of Children and Media. ‘This indicates that sexting is a lose–lose proposition for girls; regardless of whether or not they sext, their behavior is evaluated in harsh—and often sexist—terms."